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Understanding the Interior Designer

Learn how to engage an interior designer

If you want to engage an interior designer and convince her to recommend your product, you need to understand her role as a creative influencer and provide her with the tools to do her job more effectively.

Typically female, there’s a common misconception about designers: that they’re the people who come in at the end of the building process to make everything pretty. Wrong. There’s a big difference between interior designers and interior decorators.

Most interior designers obtain a four-year degree from a design program accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation. Additionally, some states require designers to complete two years of professional experience to become licensed or certified.

A small percentage of architecture firms have in-house designers, some designers work in interior design firms and many are independent consultants who partner with architecture firms for projects.

For her, it’s not just about choosing a paint color for the walls or a fabric pattern for the furniture. An interior designer precisely maps out the dimensions of a space to determine the best layout and overall room style and design. She may use design software to determine a room’s square footage, develop efficient layouts, evaluate furnishings and fabrics, and to compare color palettes.

Above all else, the designer’s top priority is to exceed her client's’ expectations. She meets with them to gain a better understanding how how the space will be used and to discuss how to maximize its functionality to support their business needs.

Like many professionals, interior designers juggle multiple priorities, from managing entire interior design projects to tracking spec information for every design element, to knowing virtually everything about the products she selects.

Lack of product knowledge is a huge concern for designers. That’s where you come in. Any commercial product manufacturer - from furnishings to carpeting to decorative accessories - who seeks to engage this audience has an opportunity to serve as an information resource that can provide the best evaluation experience. If you can be the reliable source that offers easy-to-access data sheets, product information, and product training, you’ll be that much closer to being her brand of choice. She needs your help to “wow” her clients.

Opening Doors to A&Ds

Topics: Building Products Manufacturing